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mine plan

mine plan

The way through salt mine Berchtesgaden.

  1. view from circular route
  2. ride into the mountain
  3. first slide
  4. salt cathedral
  5. stone salt grotto
  6. salt laboratory
  7. blind shaft
  8. tunneling
  9. airlift drilling equipment
  10. magic salt room
  11. second slide
  12. mirror lake
  13. reichenbach pump
  14. elevator

1. view from circular route

In less than 5 minutes from our visitor center you are at the beautiful view point. Here you can get an overview of our company grounds and of the beautiful mountain panorama.

2. ride into the mountain

With the mine train you ride 650 m into the mountain.

3. first slide

With the first slide, you slide about 34 meters down into the Kaiser Franz Sinkwerk.

4. salt cathedral

The Salt Cathedral was built more than 250 years ago and was completely filled with water up to the ceiling.

5. stone salt grotto

In honour of King Ludwig II. this grotto was built.

6. salt laboratory

A movie, learn you more about the topic salt. At the same time a front of you standing model illustrates our current mine that consists of 5 stories.

7. blind shaft

A blind shaft connects different floors in the mine. A blind shaft is only a blind shaft when the shaft has no direct connection with the ground surface level.

8. tunneling

With today's technology the engaged machinery countersinks around 2 meters per day.

9. airlift drilling equipment

These complex machine is an airlift drilling rig with the right pumps and tanks.

10. magic salt room

Here the role of the Salt for life, for the region and for the people who are working underground is represented by a high-resolution light show.

11. second slide

With the second slide you slide about 40 m down to our mirror lake.

12. mirror lake

The lake takes its name from the ceiling reflection on the water surface.

13. reichenbach pump

This 14 ton pump is made ​​entirely of bronze and was 110 years going without disruption.

14. elevator

The elevator moves you 23 meters up to the "Ferdinandberg-Sohle".